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Grand Forks Airman leads digital transition

Airman stands next to computer and smiles at camera.

Staff Sgt. Kyle Marquart stands at his workstation for an environmental portrait on June 22, 2021 at Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D. Marquart is recognized for his achievements, more specifically his lead role in the Squadron Aviation Resource Management (SARM) digital record transition effort. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Roxanne Belovarac)

GRAND FORKS AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. --

Taking out the paper waste, one page at a time. Staff Sgt. Kyle Marquart, Unit Security Manager for the 348th Reconnaissance Squadron, made movements in waste reduction by initiating and leading the transition of the Squadron Aviation Resource Management (SARM) records from paper to digital.

“My big drive behind it was we’re the only operations unit on this base, so if we can get managing this down really packed and really efficient,” Marquart said. “It gives the other Airmen in the office more time to better themselves in their free time, such as enrolling in college or working on their physical fitness.”

Marquart set up six scanners and worked with his office to digitalize more than 170 aircrew training management folders that contain over 3,400 paper documents, cutting their office paper waste by 73%.

“Marquart is one of the most hardworking people in the office and he makes work enjoyable at the same time.” said Tech. Sgt. Nathan Roach, a Non-Commissioned Officer from SARM at the 348 RS. “The amount of work that he does every day is outstanding. He’s an inspiration to me.”

He played a crucial part in building the first 319th Reconnaissance Wing Host Aviation Resource Management office.

As the USM, Marquart re-created the Joint Personnel Adjudication System program from scratch, authored the first squadron operating instruction and completed the merger to the Defense Information Security System three months ahead of schedule. 

Marquart also mentioned how the Air Force was pushing towards a ‘Digital Air Force’ to cut down on paper waste, but no office around him made a move towards it.

“I figured I could eliminate at least two cabinets full of paper locally, then hopefully that affect can ripple out,” said Marquart. “Other offices can start adopting the same, and hopefully one day we can have a paperless Air Force.”

Scanning day in and day out, page by page, Marquart was able to complete the transition from paper to digital and push the Air Force just a little closer to being paper free.